Link Round-Up: July 14, 2017

'Link Round-Up’ gives you a glimpse into the articles that got the most airtime around the Loom Analytics water cooler this week. Published every Friday, article topics include access to justice, big data, legal technology, and what’s happening in the Canadian legal landscape.

  • If you have three minutes and 18 seconds to spare, there's no better way to spend them than watching the combination rap video and cease & desist letter (you read that right) sent from Canadian rapper Brendan "B. Rich" Richmond to Coca Cola for their unlicensed use of his trademarked phrase 'Out for a Rip'. Richmond's actual lawyer can be seen in the video playing himself (he's the one making it rain in a suit jacket and shorts), which you have to assume will be a highlight of his career for many years to come.  
  • Early in June, we shared a story about the group of Twitter users threatening to sue Donald Trump if he did not unblock them on twitter. Since then, matters have escalated.  This past Tuesday, the Knight First Amendment Institute officially filed a suit against the President on behalf of seven people blocked from the @realDonaldTrump account, claiming the Twitter feed "constitutes a public forum under the First Amendment, and people can’t be blocked because of their views." Some hot takes on the matter can be found on Above the Law here.
  • In September of this year, Toronto will play host to Elevate Toronto, a technology festival which is "aimed at celebrating the city’s thriving tech ecosystem". Festival attendees will have opportunities to interact with the startup community, attend panels on a variety of subjects such as diversity and inclusion in tech, and network at the many social functions available throughout the festival.  For those looking to participate or contribute to the festival, more information is available on the official Elevate Toronto website.
 
 
  • From Vice News, the absolutely 'bananas' story of a Sulawesi crested macaque named Naruto whose copyright case was heard in the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals this week. Naruto, who got access to some camera equipment in an Indonesian rainforest and took a (presumably) accidental selfie, is at the centre of a suit by PETA on his behalf against Davis Slater, the photographer whose abandoned equipment was used to take the photo, and who later published the selfie in a book of wildlife photography. Everything about this — from the completely bonkers basis for this suit, to the monkey being named after a popular anime character, to lines like "the point is that PETA's relationship to Naruto is extremely tenuous and the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals has taken note" — is incredible.